Tasahce-Rakko, “Big Spring”

The dominant culture in North America tends to make a big deal out of the vernal equinox, around March 20, when night and day are about equal in length. Among those who define seasonal change according to strictly astronomical criteria, this marks the beginning of spring—a welcome relief from the cold and dreary conditions of … Continue reading Tasahce-Rakko, “Big Spring”

Rvfo-Rakko, “Big Winter”

The ancient Mvskoke calendar is grounded in astronomical observations. Each new year, for example, begins with posketv, the ceremony known in English as Green Corn, traditionally held around summer solstice. And the sequence of twelve hvse approximates the number of lunar months occurring in an annual period. So cokv-walv Mvskoke is structured by the sun's … Continue reading Rvfo-Rakko, “Big Winter”

Otvwoskv-Rakko, “Big Chestnut-Thrashing”

The American chestnut was one of the most important natural resources available to Mvskokes in the old country.  The ripened nuts are nourishing and delicious; they can be roasted, boiled, dried, ground into flour, salted for storage, or eaten raw from the bur. Until recent times, chestnuts were also the most vital wildlife food in … Continue reading Otvwoskv-Rakko, “Big Chestnut-Thrashing”

Hvyo-Rakko, “Big Harvest”

Mvskoke tradition has long recognized corn as a sacred staple.  It's among the first fruits of the land, and the Mvskoke year begins when the new corn crops are ready. Yet this "little harvest" is followed by one that is even larger in size, if not in ceremonial significance. Mvskoke agriculture was a mature, robust … Continue reading Hvyo-Rakko, “Big Harvest”