More Free to a Good Home

I have a very limited supply of the paperback editions of my four book-length publications (below). If you will pay the postage ($7.75 USPS Priority Mail Flat Rate Envelope), I will be happy to mail you one of these books, signed or inscribed as you like. Please send me a message using the contact form in the right sidebar of this website, and be sure to include your email address. I will respond with payment instructions within 48 hours; if you don’t hear from me, check your spam/junk folder, since I will be replying from a private email account that might get blocked/filtered on your end.

ASFp

Around the Sacred Fire:
Native Religious Activism in the Red Power Era

University of Illinois Press, 2008

One of the founders and leaders of the movement was Clifton Hill, an outspoken Mvskoke activist. Many other Creek Nation citizens attended the annual gatherings including Phillip Deere, an influential Mvskoke elder. The Conference’s “sacred fire” was patterned after those kindled at the ceremonial grounds maintained by Mvskoke people and their indigenous neighbors.

NC

Native and Christian:
Indigenous Voices on Religious Identity
in the United States and Canada

Routledge, 1996

Includes the important essay “Who Can Sit at the Lord’s Table? The Experience of Indigenous Peoples” by Mvskoke writer Rosemary McCombs Maxey.

FTL

For This Land:
Writings on Religion in America
 

by Vine Deloria Jr.
Routledge, 1999

Includes several brief mentions of Mvskoke groups and individuals – along with other Oklahoma Indians – in order to illustrate broader patterns in American religious history.

WCC

Writing the Cross Culture:
Native Fiction on

the White Man’s Religion
Fulcrum Publishing, 2006

Includes short stories by Mvskoke writers Alexander Posey, Durango Mendoza, and Joy Harjo.

And I still have a few copies of the hardback edition of my book Around the Sacred Fire: Native Religious Activism in the Red Power Era, originally published in 2003 by Palgrave Macmillan / St. Martin’s Press. Let me know if you would like a copy, signed or inscribed as you like, for the price of postage ($7.75).

Mvto (Thanks),
James Treat

Free to a Good Home

I have a limited supply of my book Around the Sacred Fire: Native Religious Activism in the Red Power Era, originally published in 2003 by Palgrave Macmillan / St. Martin’s Press. This “narrative map” of the Indian Ecumenical Conference tells the story of an important intertribal movement among native people throughout Canada and the U.S. during the 1970s and beyond.

One of the founders and leaders of the Conference was Clifton Hill, an outspoken Mvskoke activist. Many other Creek Nation citizens attended the annual gatherings including Phillip Deere, an influential Mvskoke elder. The Conference’s “sacred fire” was patterned after those kindled at the ceremonial grounds maintained by Mvskoke people and their indigenous neighbors.

If you will pay the postage ($7.75 USPS Priority Mail Flat Rate Envelope), I will be happy to mail you a first edition hardback of Around the Sacred Fire, signed or inscribed as you like. Please send me a message using the contact form in the right sidebar of this website – don’t forget to include your email address.

Mvto (Thanks),
James Treat

Likepvs cē

Likepvs cē / Welcome!

The Muscogee (Creek) Nation is one of the largest federally recognized tribes in the so-called United States, with a population of 87,344 enrolled citizens as of April 2019. This website is dedicated to Mvskoke cultural and ecological traditions in Indian Territory (eastern Oklahoma), in the original homelands of Mvskokvlke (Alabama and Georgia, thereabouts), and anywhere else este Mvskoke happen to be living.

Mvskoke Country began in 2009 as a monthly column on environmental issues published in the Muscogee Nation News, reprinted elsewhere, and archived here. Each installment offered a topical perspective on enduring themes in human ecology; I tried to connect local concerns with global realities and to reconnect Mvskoke traditions with the natural world. Many of these pieces incorporated insights gained from close study of the Mvskoke language, which bears evidence of ecological decline in the historical period.

In February 2010, I presented this work at the Food Sovereignty Symposium organized by the Mvskoke Food Sovereignty Initiative. In July 2010, “West Texas or Worse” was awarded second place in the Best Column Monthly/Bi-Monthly category at the annual Media Awards of the Native American Journalists Association. In 2010-11, I wrote a yearlong series on the Mvskoke calendar and its relationship to natural phenomena.

In 2011, I added a web-only feature: field notes, a weekly feed of vital insights from Mvskoke ecological knowledge. New posts appeared on Wednesdays, Ennvrkvpv—literally, “the middle of (the week)”—because that’s where we humans stand with respect to our natural environment: in the middle of things, and with no clear way out of the ecological crises we’ve created. The monthly column and weekly feed went on hiatus later that year while I worked on other projects.

In 2016-17, I posted monthly found poems on human ecology drawn from interviews with mostly elderly people in the Muscogee (Creek) Nation recorded in the 1930s. Revised versions of some of these pieces, along with many newfound poems from the archive, will appear in a book titled A Sort of Strange Land: Poems Found in Indian Territory.

In 2018, I began posting vintage recipes for traditional Mvskoke dishes from hard-to-find cookbooks and other obscure sourcesIn 2019, I began writing a quarterly column titled Pum Ēkvnv / Our Land” for POME Magazine, another MCN publication. I try to keep the links in the sidebar up-to-date, though external links found elsewhere on this website may be obsolete.

I am descended from the Evans and Escoe families, whose allotments were in the Oktaha area, south of Muskogee. I was born in Anadarko, in the western part of the state, and grew up in off-reservation communities in northeast Kansas and western South Dakota. After an academic vocation teaching at several public research universities, I am now an autonomous scholar, freelance creative, indigenous advocate, and nonviolent outdoorsman living in southwest New Mexico, within walking distance of the Continental Divide.

If you like what you find here, tell a friend.
If you have any comments or questions, let me know.

Mvto / Thanks
James Treat