Tafvmpuce

tafvmpucetafvmpuce
“onions-little”
wild onions

The Indian Cook Book, 1933

Two bunches of wild onions, bacon grease, salt and a little water. Cook ten or fifteen minutes then break six or seven eggs and scramble in with the onions and serve hot.

As this is one of Will Rogers’s favorite dishes, Mrs. Rebecca Swain suggests we call it Will Rogers Delight.

Beulah Simms, 1970

Wild onions can best be found in early spring time or even late winter, as soon as the winter snows have melted and the ground has thawed. The onions with long slender leaves and onion smell are found on creek banks or in shaded, wooded areas. Dig up sufficient quantities; about four hands full.

Clean and wash thoroughly, making certain all the soil is washed out of the leaves. Cut into one-inch lengths. Place the onions in a skillet with one-half cup water and simmer until the onions are tender. If the onions are old, simmer in salt water. Pour off the water and add two tablespoons bacon grease and cook until the onions are wilted. Add one teaspoon salt and six beaten eggs and stir until the eggs are completely cooked.

Hokti's tafvmpuceA Creek Indian has not fully prepared for the advent of summer until he has eaten his fill of wild onions in the spring, and it is even better if the meal has been shared with good friends.

The flowers of the wild onion are rose, reddish-purple and white in color. The leaves of the wild onion are two to four inches or more high. “Crow’s Poison” looks very much like the wild onion but has flat leaves and does not have the onion smell.

Cookbook of the Five Civilized Tribes of Oklahoma, 1976

When wild onions are nice and tender in early spring, gather them using a table knife and digging (modern way, a shovel). Clean by snipping the roots close to bulb.

When desired amount is clean, wash and cut into about two-inch lengths and place in warm bacon dripping. Cover and cook, adding small amounts of water until tender. Add four eggs and cook longer, stirring with a fork.

Creek Muscogee Recipes, Cooking Tips and Lore, 1999

A favorite use of wild onions is in combination with scrambled eggs. The particular recipe varies with each individual or family, some like lots of wild onions with only enough scrambled eggs to hold them together. Others prefer to have their scrambled eggs flavored with a small amount of the onions to taste.

To cook wild onions with eggs, chop onions into small pieces. Add two to three tablespoons of bacon drippings or oil in a skillet over medium heat. Add onions, one-quarter cup water and salt to taste, simmer and stir until onions are tender. When most of the water is cooked out and the onions are tender add six slightly beaten eggs and scramble.

Serve hot with fry bread and honey.

Cinda Wind, 2000

You just cut them, clean them up, and wash them. Just get a skillet—a big skillet—and put three ounces of cooking oil or one-half cup of grease, preferably pure lard, in there. Put the onions in there along with a little warm water. Let them go to cooking. Then after a while, when they go to getting done and get tender, you can put a little bit of eggs in there, as many eggs as you like. Then stir it up and simmer covered on low heat for thirty to forty-five minutes until it gets done, then it’s ready to eat. That’s all I know.

I like to eat salt meat with mine.

Bertha Tilkens, 2009

Wild onions are found in early spring, around small creeks or in areas where the ground stays pretty moist. Dig them up and clean them like you would garden onions (remove the outermost skin and wash them well).

Cut them up, place them in a skillet with cooking oil, and add water. Cover the pan and let it simmer until the heads (white parts) of the onions are transparent. Add beaten eggs and cook until the eggs are done.

Serve with salt pork or bacon.

Dicey Barnett, 2011

Pick two bunches of wild onions when young and tender in early spring.

Wash and cut into one- to two-inch lengths and place in warm bacon drippings or two to three tablespoons oil over medium heat. Cover and cook, adding small amounts of water until tender. Add four eggs or more, depending upon how many onions you have, stirring with fork until done. Salt to taste. Stir and simmer covered on low heat a few minutes longer and then serve and enjoy!

tafvmpuce2

“Wild onion season bridges tradition with a good meal,” in Oklahoma Indian Times 6, no. 3 (March 31, 2000): 2.

“Wild Onion and Eggs” by Dicey Barnett, in Mvskoke Food Sovereignty Initiative Newsletter 4, no. 3 (March 2011): 6.

Other Sources

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